Archive for the Lucifer (band) Category

Update 04/15/2020: Quarantine Blues III

Posted in A. Lee Martinez, Antonio Margheriti, Barbara Steele, Black Sunday (1960), Boris Karloff, Bram Stoker, Carlo Rustichelli, Christopher Lee, Contes cruels, Count Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy, Cryptozoology, Denisse Montoya, Doom Metal, Dracula, Full Moon Features, Giallo, Gil's All Fright Diner (2006), Guy de Maupassant, Halina Zalewska, Hammer Horror, I tre volti della paura (1963), Johanna Sadonis, John Langan, Kiss (band), La frusta e il corpo (1963), Lamberto Bava, Lucifer (band), Lucifer III (2020), Mario Bava, Motörhead, Paul Stanley, Puppet Master (franchise), Rue Morgue Magazine, The Fisherman (2016), Tim Lucas, Updates, Zachary Strupp with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2020 by Manuel Paul Arenas

Well I believe it has been around a month since I have visited either family or friends. My only social interactions are with co-workers and the staff at my local coffee shop, both of which are necessarily brief. I cannot wait till this is all over and done with; although, as I told my cousin when I called her this weekend to relay my good tidings for the holiday, even when they lift the quarantine edict, I am not sure that I will feel safe enough to see anyone right away. We’ll see what happens whenever they do.

A colleague at work made me a mask, but I am having issues with the fastening buttons, trying to get them into the thread loops. I am just not that nimble with my arthritic fingers anymore. I may have to attach a safety pin or something the get it to stay in place. My friend Denisse says she is going to try to procure some quilter’s cotton, which apparently is good for filtering out the virus. If she does, she promise’s to hook me up with a mask. Fingers crossed…

In the interim, I try to stay connected through calls and text, as I have none of the gadgets that people are using to keep in touch. My good friend Zach Strupp sent me a care-package, which I received Saturday. It was loaded with goodies: first off, there were two novels which he wanted me to read, one is Gil’s All Fright Diner (2006), by A. Lee Martinez, which he has been trying to have me read for some time, and the other is The Fisherman (2016), by John Langan, a weird tale about two widowers and their encounter with a figure called The Fisherman. I started reading the latter, since he was anxious that I should do so, so we can talk about it. So far I am wrapping up the 3rd chapter, which is the set up. The action is supposed to begin in the 4th chapter, which begins the second section of the book.

The Fisherman, by John Langan (2016, Word Horde).

Also in the box were two notepads, both a red and a black pen, 3 issues of Rue Morgue magazine (one of which was one of their special themed publications-from their Rue Morgue Library-this one featuring the creatures of cryptozoology), a DVD of the Puppet Master franchise from Full Moon Features, various supplies and paper products and, last but not least, some plastic Easter Eggs filled with little malted egg candies! Zach has begun a blog where he talks Horror films and various other topics which you may find at http://www.filthyhorrors.com. Also, if you’re looking for a fun read you can check out his Killing Heart book series available on Amazon in both trade paperback and eBook formats.

Rue Morgue Library: Monstro Bizarro.

Saturday I picked up (curbside; a popular service these days during the lockdown) a CD I ordered from Zia records of the latest album by Johanna Sadonis & co., Lucifer III. The sound is a continuation of the more streamlined, 70’s rock sound from the previous album replete with Johanna’s customary occult themes. Sadly, it seems the Doom Metal of Lucifer I is definitely a thing of the past, but once one accepts that, it’s not a bad album. In fact, I rather like the song Midnight Phantom, which is featured in one of two videos made to promote the album. There is no new ground treaded here, but overall the quality of the remaining album is consistently decent if not exactly revelatory. What can I say? I just Like Johanna Sadonis. Oh, by the way, she is now Johanna Plowtow Andersson, having married her writing partner, drummer Nicke Plotow Andersson.

Lucifer 2020 (l to r): Harald Göthblad (bass), Martin Nordin (guitar), Johanna Plotow Andersson (vocals), Nicke Plotow Andersson (drums), Linus Björklund (guitar).

Caveat emptor , I have seen several reviews of the LP on Amazon where customers complain about the album sleeve being a bit flimsy and either arriving damaged in the mail or falling apart once they open it. As usual, there are multiple collectible versions  featuring colored vinyl, a copy of the CD, and a black and white version of the above photo with autographs by the images of the respective bandmembers. As with their previous albums, there are several singles and non-album b-sides accompanying this release. Apparently Lucifer were part of some challenge where groups were asked to write a song in the style of Motörhead, the results of which were made available as part of a subscription promotion for a Swedish music magazine. The resulting single, Fire Up & Ride can be heard on YouTube, but the 7″ single was limited edition in 111 copies, presumably long gone. I rather like it and wish they’d make it available for order on their site. I have also found a recent recording of a Paul Stanley song, Take Me Away (Together as One). The cover is okay, but the song isn’t especially exciting for me. I have never been a Kiss fan, and their solo work even less so.

Fire Up and Ride single by Lucifer

I spent most of my past week and this weekend watching Italian Horror films. I have several on Blu-ray, but my player shit the bed a while back, so I turned to my DVDs, beginning with Antonio Margheriti‘s I lunghi capelli della morte (1964, The Long Hair of Death), featuring my beloved Barbara Steele. In the 15th century a woman, Adele, is put to death for witchcraft, by Count Humboldt whose advances she spurned. Her daughter Mary (Steele in one of her infamous dual roles) tries to sway him but as he takes advantage of her offer, the mother is burned in a public execution. In her dying breath, she curses Humboldt and predicts the fall of his house. When Mary finds out about his betrayal she runs, but is overtaken by the Count and pushed off a cliff into a running stream where she perishes.

Adele’s youngest daughter, Lisabeth is taken in by the Count and raised within Humboldt castle, where she grows to be a lovely, but very sober woman. This role as well as that of Adele, is portrayed by the actress Halina Zalewska. The count’s son, Kurt, has his greedy eyes on Lisabeth and hounds her till she reluctantly consents, under some duress, to marry him. He is a cad, and is abusive with her and continually forces himself on her until the arrival of a new face… or is it? This is another plague movie by the way. I seem to keep coming across these nowadays. The Long Hair of Death is sometimes dismissed as a second tier movie because of it’s deliberate pace, but I believe it’s worth wading through the slow build up to fully appreciate the devastating climax. Besides, there is plenty of Gothic atmosphere and Steele is her usual uncanny self.

Barbara Steele as Helen Rochefort, eyeing her prey.

I then moved on to a Mario Bava-thon, beginning with my favorite, La maschera del demonio (1960, Black Sunday). As I have stated before, this Gothic fantasy is unequalled in it’s decadent visual style and in Steele’s performance in the dual roles of Princesses Asa & Katia Vajda. She is lovely as the mild and innocent Katia, but it as her wicked ancestor, Asa that her infamy rests. Her mixture of passionate eroticism and vile grotesqueness are positively mesmerizing. The opening scene, featuring her execution through having a spiked mask pounded onto her comely countenance, is as graphic as anyone had seen in a film of this type previously. Neither Bava, nor anyone else for that matter, ever topped this film, within the genre, for it’s visual splendor and grotesque beauty. A final note: I especially love the scene where her identity is discovered by the romantic lead to be that of the witch and not the ingénue and we are treated to a view of her not-as-yet regenerated torso which harkens the cover art from the penny dreadful Varney the Vampire, with the titular vampire’s exposed ribcage.

Asa uncloaked.

I then watched the Italian cut of I tre volti della paura (1963, Black Sabbath). My only complaint about this version is that it doesn’t have most of the intros by Karloff, nor does it have his incomparable vocal performance  (being dubbed into Italian). That said, this version does contain the original running order of the shorts as well as the preferred edit of the giallo segment The Telephone, that dispenses with the convoluted supernatural pretense and also shows the true nature of the relationship between the two women. The Karloff segment, The Wurdalak, is loosely based on the Family of the Vourdalak (1839) by Count Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy, although it also owes a bit to Guy de Maupassant‘s story, La peur (1882, Fear) which tells the story of the traveler coming upon a home where a family is held prisoner by fear of the avenging revenant of a felled villain. Bava scholar, Tim Lucas believes Karloff’s look, as Gorca the paterfamilias, is reminiscent of Bram Stoker‘s description of Count Dracula. Perhaps, I don’t know whether that was intentional or just happenstance. It does have some genuinely creepy stuff that might not fly nowadays, like Gorca preying on his grandson. That aside, Karloff is brilliant, and this version contains some gory scenes (for the time period) that AIP cut out for the American release. The third segment, The Drop of Water, which ends the American release, yet begins the Italian cut, is based on a story accredited to Anton Chekov,  yet was later discovered to actually be based on a story called Dalle due alle tre e mezzo by Italian author Franco Lucentini. Basically, the story is about a woman who comes to prepare the body of a deceased medium for burial. The medium, who apparently died of an attack of some sort during a séance, is left with a ghastly grimace on her face, which spooks the woman, but not enough to keep her from pilfering a ring from the dead medium’s hand; an act that will incur dire consequences. I recall being terrified by this segment when I first saw it, many moons ago. Bava’s son, Lamberto Bava, says that since seeing this segment he cannot sleep at night if there is a dripping faucet anywhere in his home. The face was made by Bava’s father, sculptor Eugenio Bava. An unnamed actor wore it in the scene where the corpse rises from it’s repose, but the rest of the time it was affixed to a dummy that was rolled around on wheels to give the effect of it floating, rather than walking towards its victim.

The corpse of the medium with it’s ghastly grimace.

Next up was Operazione paura (1966, Kill, Baby, Kill). I have always felt that this film was a bit weak, although seeing it again now, I really enjoyed it. It doesn’t have any stars like Barbara Steele to recommend it, but there are some great characters, like the Baroness Graps (portrayed by Giana Vivaldi), a noblewoman fallen on hard times in the mode of Dickens’ Miss Havisham from Great Expectations. The Baroness’ daughter Melissa perished 10 years prior due to the negligence of her neighbors when she was run down by a carriage and they ignored her requests for help. Now her vengeful ghost keeps the villagers in constant fear of her deadly visitations. Melissa was actually played by a boy, Valerio Valeri, who gave her a creepy quality. Despite his androgynous look, one can tell in the murk of one’s mind that something is a bit off. This usage of a child as the instrument of evil has since become a common cinematic trope in the genre.

Creepy Melissa Graps and her dolls.

The last of the Bava Gothics I watched was La frusta e il corpo (1963, The Whip and the Body) featuring Hammer Horror star Christopher Lee and Israeli actress Daliah Lavi. This is a strange movie. Lee is Kurt Menliff, an estranged son returning to his family castle to stake his claim on his inheritance and bring discord to his brother’s recent marriage to his former lover, Nevenka (Lavi). Nevenka claims to hate Kurt, but is obviously obsessed with him and the film depicts in frank terms their sadomasochistic relationship, which upset a lot of people when the movie first came out, causing it to be seized for charges of obscenity, which were later dropped.

Kurt is killed early on and buried, but Nevenka claims to be haunted by his ghost, who comes and whips her in her bedroom when everyone else is asleep. These scenes were cut from the American release, which made the movie very confusing for viewers. All this however, has been restored in the respective DVD/Blu-ray releases from Kino Lorber. Although upset that he wasn’t asked to do the voice dub for the English version of the film, Christopher Lee was very proud of his role as Kurt, and he seems to really relish lording over the exquisite Daliah Lavi,  who gives a passionate performance as the harried Nevenka, whose true feelings for Kurt, despite her constant declarations of her hate for him, are betrayed by her ecstatic response to his flagellate ministrations: “You haven’t changed, I see. You’ve always loved violence.” Kurt growls as he lashes her.

Kurt and Nevenka (Lee and Lavi: note the whip in her hand.)

The film is dripping with Gothic atmosphere and tropes and has an Anne Radcliffe type twist ending that has some minor plot holes but one may forgive them when weighed against the great performances from the lead actors. The celebrated film score, known as the Windsor Concerto, by Carlo Rustichelli, who also scored The Long Hair of Death and Kill, Baby, Kill, is very lush and brings to mind the grandiose Romantic piano concertos of the late 19th century.

 

Next installment: Bava goes Giallo!

 

 

 

Lucifer II

Posted in Doom Metal, Gaz Jennings, Johanna Sadonis, Lucifer (band), Scorpions (band) with tags , , , on August 25, 2018 by Manuel Paul Arenas

After many months of chomping at the bit for any news on the follow up to their impressive 2015 debut album, the band Lucifer, brainchild of German Doom Queen Johanna Sadonis, has finally released their sophomore effort, Lucifer II, this past July. I have held off on reviewing the album for a bit because I wanted to live with it for a while before I passed any judgment upon it. In the three years since their previous album, a skillful admixture of Doom Metal and melodic old school hard rock, the line up has been almost entirely revamped, which has changed both the groups sound and overall vibe considerably. Most notably, the loss of guitarist Gaz Jennings has really altered the structure and sound of the songs. The new songs, which Sadonis penned with mutli-instrumentalsit Nicke Andersson, are a lot more straightforward and the occult vibe of Sadonis’ previous efforts has been watered down as well. Instead of all the esoteric references to numerology and magick or the Luciferian paeans, the new album abounds with power ballads and generic hard rock motifs. There is however a cover of the Rolling Stones voodoo song Dancing with Mr. D, which I think improves upon the original, and the one legitimate doom song on the album, Faux Pharoah is the only song which reprises some of the compositional complexity of the previous album. That being said, the lyrics feel a bit lackluster.

Lucifer II by Lucifer (2018, Century Media)

Before the album release Lucifer put out a 45 RPM single of then soon-to-be-released album opening track California Son, for which they also released a music video. As I believe I stated before in the review for the Faux Pharaoh digital download, the new vibe seems to be like late-70s Scorpions with biker gear and a slick European hard rock sound. To further cinch the comparison, they do a b-side cover of the Scorpions moody Evening Wind from their 1975 album In Trance. The 45 initially came with a digital download which was cool because even though I wanted the collectible 45, I need to replace my turntable, so I figured I would listen to the digital download until I was able to do so. Unfortunately, it seems someone decided they didn’t want to leave up the download and so it was taken down before I got a chance to use it. The contact for Electric Assault records, who pressed the 45, claimed it was the band. I don’t know for sure. So I have the 45, but have not heard it yet.

California Son 7″ single by Lucifer (2018, Electric Assault Records).

Shortly before the album release another video was released for the song Dreamer, a power ballad which actually is quite tuneful and has a nice heavy midsection that hints at the band’s doomy origins. The video is notable for featuring the three guitarist line-up of the touring band. It seems to me that in both videos, but especially Dreamer, the emphasis is on Sadonis. She is presented as a sort of romanticized rock & roll chanteuse, with soft focus and ethereal light on her golden head and many long shots of her leather and spandex clad figure. She looks great for sure, but if this is the direction the band will be going in I fear they may end up being brushed off as just another rock band with a pretty female singer, which I believe ultimately does Sadonis & co. a disservice.

In summation, I think the album is a big step in what may be a more commercially viable direction, but at the cost of their musical significance and integrity. Think of it as the difference between one of the classic Black Sabbath albums of the 70-73 era like Paranoid, or Vol. 4, and one of the last great Ozzy solo albums like Bark at the Moon. It’s still heavy, but not nearly as much as the previous effort, and its streamlined mainstream sound and has more in common with Power Pop than Doom Metal, in essence.

Afterthought: I heard both Sadonis and Andersson mention their mutual love of the occult-rock band Blue Öyster Cult in a recent online interview and there is some of that in there as well, but nothing so dark of heavy as on Lucifer I. Even so, I still hope to see them on tour and await their proximate album with much anticipation…and apprehension.

Lucifer’s “Faux Pharaoh”

Posted in Doom Metal, Faux Pharaoh, Johanna Sadonis, Lucifer (band) with tags , , , on January 20, 2018 by Manuel Paul Arenas

Lucifer band logo featuring the current trio line-up.

Well it seems that after a 2 year hiatus,  Lucifer has finally got a new album in the can which they plan to release sometime in the Spring of 2018. In the meantime they have released a download of their newest single, Faux Pharaoh.  Despite retaining their Doom Metal stance, their new sound is slightly more polished and mainstream than their previous work, though it still rocks, and of course Johanna’s lyrics explore familiar themes of occultism, Egyptology and death. The band is down to a trio, consisting of Johanna Sadonis, Nicke Andersson & Robin Tidebrink.  Multi-instrumentalist Andersson seems to be a veteran of the Stockholm punk & metal scene, most notably in The Hellacopters, Death Breath and The Entombed, and Tidebrink (ex-Saturn) played supplementary guitar for Lucifer on the last tour. One may see him in the Oldenberg video on Youtube playing some tasty solos over Gaz Jennings’ heavy riffage. I assume the wah-wah solo in Faux Pharaoh is his.

Lucifer in 2017: Robin Tidebrink, Johanna Sadonis, and Nicke Andersson, looking as polished and pretty as their new single.

Speaking of Mr. Jennings, his guitar sound is conspicuously absent from this recording. I imagine his layered tones and unique riffing style will be sorely missed on Lucifer II. Even so, the new song is decent, Sadonis sounds great, and I am curious to hear the full album when it comes out. I just hope that I am not disappointed, as my expectations are high after having played both Lucifer I and the Oath album to death,  which also features Ms. Sadonis. I will definitely review it here once I give it a few spins, and I will also try my damnedest to see them when they take the new album on the road.

Faux Pharaoh is available for download on Lucifer’s Bandcamp profile: https://luciferofficial.bandcamp.com/releases

Johanna Sadonis: Queen of Satanic Doom

Posted in Black Sabbath, Blood Ceremony (band), Doom Metal, Gaz Jennings, Johanna Sadonis, Lucifer (band), Rise Above Records, The Oath (band) with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 14, 2017 by Manuel Paul Arenas

I have been a fan of the group Black Sabbath since my grade-school chum Jan den Hartog turned me on to the album Sabbath Bloody Sabbath (1973) back in 1978. Their melodic, doom-laden riffs touch a dark spot on my soul (my “d-spot”?) in a way that few bands have done since. Although they spawned legions of followers and imitators, few have really understood what it was that made them so great. Within the subgenre of Doom Metal, which was directly inspired by their more infamously heavy tracks such as Electric Funeral (1970) and Into the Void (1971), there are a slew of bands that just play plodding, drop-tuned riffs and tri-tones with someone growling indecipherably about death and despair. Unfortunately, they do not have the knack for writing a catchy melody or an interesting bridge, which is part of what made Sabbath so successful.

Johanna Sadonis striking a decidedly devilish posture.

Recently, however, I have come across a few bands which seem to have finally  created a more accessible brand of Doom influenced music. The first band to catch my ear was Blood Ceremony, whom I have already covered here on the Book of Shadows. The next were a pair of bands (both labelmates of Blood Ceremony, on Rise Above Records) that shared a connection through a common member: vocalist Johanna Sadonis.  The bands, The Oath and Lucifer, respectively, are both Doom influenced but have much more going on than your average Doom band. I cannot find much information on either band online, but I did find this under the entry for Sadonis on the Encyclopedia Metallum:

Female vocalist, DJ and promoter from Berlin, Germany, who sang in various metal bands during the ’90s/early 00’s. In 2010, she was part of the electronic indie pop band Informer along with Rayshele Teige, a former employee of Century Media in the US. She’s currently the lead vocalist of the Berlin/London-based heavy rock band Lucifer.  [Encyclopedia Metallum_Johanna Sadonis_retrieved 11/10/2017]

Promo Pic for the Oath featuring (left to right)Linnéa Olsson & Johanna Sadonis.

Although not mentioned in the preceding bio, from 2012-2014  Sadonis fronted the band The Oath, which also featured Swedish guitarist Linnéa Olsson (not to be confused with the progressive-pop cellist). I cannot tell whether the rest of the band are just session musicians, but I did notice that there is another guitarist credited with the guitar solos. All the promotional photos however are solely of the women, both lovely blondes, clad in black leather. Make no mistake though, this is not a puff band. These ladies can rock. The opening track, All Must Die, is a bass-driven rocker reminiscent of  Motorhead’s Ace of Spades which sets the tone for the rest of the album, the sound of which is retro but not derivative. The overall vibe is of a polished NWOBHM (New Wave of British Heavy Metal) from the 80’s but with catchy hooks and Sadonis’ clear vocals singing her paeans to Lucifer; imagine if Girlschool had hung out with Tony Iommi instead of Lemmy Kilminster, and you’ll have the idea. There’s even a requisite acoustic guitar piece! How’s that for old school? The songs are tuneful and simple but the arrangements are interesting with some unusual choices. Not being schooled in music theory, I cannot say exactly what’s different, but I can definitely hear it.

The album was a hit in the metal community, and the vinyl version even came with a collectible 7″ single featuring a cover of the song Night of the Demon by NWOBHM band Demon, which is better than the original. Then, just as their downward-pointing star was rising, they broke up leaving everyone asking WTF? I have looked online and even watched an interview with Sadonis online, but whatever it was that was the catalyst to the split, she doesn’t seem to be very forthcoming about it. Perhaps there are legal reasons for her reticence. Olsson joined the Finnish Goth-Rock band Grave Pleasures (a waste of her talent, IMHO) and Sadonis ditched the leather jacket for a satin kimono with an eye on the back, which I suspect is the left eye of Thoth symbolizing the moon, wisdom, and magic. She formed a new band with Oath drummer Andy Prestidge, named after her favorite inamorato: Lucifer.

Variant pressings of Lucifer’s “Anubis/Morning Star” 45″ single, which I borrowed from the Epicus-Metal blogspot.

They put out the single Anubis which eschewed the NWOBHM sound for a more explicitly Doom-influenced  sound with a fuzzed-out headbang-inducing riff that couldn’t help but bring to mind the glory days of Sabbath. Unfortunately, the vocal melody is a hodgepodge of vocal lines from Sabbath’s 1972 ode to cocaine, Snowblind. Even so, it’s a lot of fun and definitely worth a spin and the B-side, Morning Star, an awesome slab of Doom Metal with a nod to Iron Maiden, would resurface, in a slightly tighter performance, on the subsequent album,  Lucifer I.

Vinyl copy of Lucifer I (2015, Rise Above).

At first listen, I wasn’t sure what I thought of the long-play album. The first track I heard off the album was the single, Izrael, for which they have a promotional video. It didn’t seem quite as heavy as the Anubis single and it almost sounded pop-ish were it not for the heavy guitars and occult themed lyrics. It grew on me though, as did the album and I eventually decided to purchase my own copy.

Now I beg your indulgence while I share with you my experience in picking up this CD at my local record store. I had seen a used copy at a Mesa branch of the store I frequent, which shall remain nameless here, but didn’t get a chance to buy it then, so I had them transfer it to the store by my home in Phoenix. When I picked it up, the cashier was a young man who was genial and even sported an Iron Maiden t-shirt. When he pulled it off the hold shelf to ring it up, he seemed a bit awed by it and asked something to the effect of, “Is this what I think it is?” To which I responded “Actually, it’s a bit different, the riffs are heavy but there are clear vocals over the top providing a nice contrast; it’s actually quite beautiful.”

You see, I believed he had been inquiring as to its sonic heft, but apparently I was wrong, for his response was, “The bible says the devil will make himself beautiful.” Yeah…well I just countered with a bemused “Uh-huh.” then ended my part in the conversation. Even so, he continued, seemingly so freaked out by it that he could hardly express himself, faltering for words. His sentences trailed off and he seemed to be almost enchanted by the album. He commented on the cover art, which as you well can see has nothing but the name of the band, yet he was afraid to even touch it. He commented on the track titles, specifically Morning Star and Izrael. Eventually we finished the transaction and I was able to leave the store but I was definitely put off by the whole interaction. This is what I deal with all the time in this part of the country. I have no problem with folks believing what they want as long as I don’t have to hear about it and it doesn’t impinge on my own civil rights. It’s hard to be a free thinker when  everyone else is still living in the Dark Ages. I think that I did confirm for him that the lyrical content did lean towards the diabolic; but in truth, Sadonis’ themes are not like that of say Venom, or Slayer, both of whom focus on demonism, maleficia and blasphemy, whereas her lyrics lean more towards metaphysics and ritual magick.

Anyway, off the soapbox and back to the album: I finally got a chance to hear Lucifer I on my CD Walkman (don’t judge) and was able to hear its layers and nuances. It’s not quite as layered as say a Kevin Shields composition, but there were times (like in Izrael)when I was reminded of Brian May’s layered guitar work on the early Queen albums, or even Tony Iommi for that matter. This might be due to the addition of guitarist Gaz Jennings, late of the English Doom Metal veterans Cathedral. His talent for composing choice riffs make him a pretender to the Iommi mantel of Riff-master General. There also are chimes to be heard on here and in places, rain, birds, and even tolling bells appear on the appropriately named Sabbath. The overall sound of the album is vaguely psychedelic, which suit Sadonis’ plaintive vocal style and arcane lyrical themes a bit better, yet with an updated take on the old school heavy rock sound.

In the interview she did with Jimmy Cabbs she spoke of how their goal was not to look back to retread old territory so much as to look for inspiration which they would absorb then apply with a modern approach. She and (I believe) bassist Dino Gollnick spoke in the interview of trying to make things simple and go back to the roots of heavy music as Metal has become so extreme these days and how much further can one take it? Gollnick is gone now however, as are Jennings and Prestridge, according to the Encyclopedia Metallum, which lists Sadonis as the only consistent member in the current lineup. Even so, no matter who she works with she seems to come out okay and to hone her musical vision just a little bit more, and I look forward to whatever she comes up with next.

PS: I have noticed that a lot of haters have been posting on Youtube that Johanna is just a Jinx Dawson wannabe. For those of you who are not familiar with Ms. Dawson, she was the vocalist and primary lyricist for the band Coven whose 1969 debut album Witchcraft Destroys Minds & Reaps Souls was a minor hit in the underground music scene. Despite their Satanic subject matter, Coven’s music was psychedelic pop without much heft. They were definitely unique and probably one of the very first bands to openly sing about occult topics and especially witchcraft, but they never really were metal in any way shape or form. Jinx Dawson, now accepted as the Grande Dame of occult rock has rebooted her career and is touring with a new band brandishing a heavier sound and touting herself as the Metal Goth Queen.

Album cover for Coven’s Witchcraft Destroys Minds & Reaps Souls (1969,Mercury). Jinx Dawson is the pictured on the far left side.

Now, with all respect to Ms. Dawson and her legacy, the only similarity between them is that they both have long blonde hair and they both have occult themed lyrics. One might argue that Dawson paved the way for the likes of Sadonis, but I don’t hear any specific similarity in their styles or even stage personas. Don’t drink the haterade, don’t believe the trolls.

Update 12/28/2017

After living with these albums a while, I find that I cannot get enough of  Lucifer I. I still dig the Oath album, but find myself returning to the Lucifer album time and again. Basically, what keeps me coming back are the catchy minor keyed melodies, the choice fuzzy riffs and the clean vocals. I really get tired of the fact that every time I find a new heavy band I like, the vocalist sounds like the Cookie Monster. I also find the lyrics intriguing. It also helps that there are numerous live videos of the band on Youtube. The best one being a gig at a record store in Oldenburg, Germany. The video and audio quality is great and the band burns through a 50+ minute set which basically includes Anubis and most of their debut album.

Loser 7″ (2015, Rise Above).

Apparently there exists a limited edition of the LP that includes a 7″ single featuring two cover songs, Devil’s on the Loose and Loser (the former originally by The Rattles and the latter by Angel Witch). I have heard Loser on Youtube and it is a decent tune but doesn’t quite fit with the Sabbathy sound of the album proper. I am curious to hear the other track and shall look for this version in the future as well as the Oath LP with the Night of the Demon single.